• Dracut

    Dracut incorporated in 1701, is governed by an open town meeting, a five member Board of Selectmen and a Town Manager. The Town is located in northeastern Middlesex County about 28 miles north of Boston. It is bordered on the north by Pelham, New Hampshire, on the east by Methuen, Massachusetts, on the south by Lowell and Tewksbury, Massachusetts and on the west by Tyngsborough, Massachusetts. The Town occupies a land area of 20.84 square miles. 

    It is a pleasant residential community utilizing the Community Preservation Act to preserve its agricultural, historical and open space heritage. Former mill buildings along Beaver Brook have undergone adaptive reuse as commercial and residential facilities. It offers a full range of housing from high end surrounding a golf course to deed restricted affordable units and much in between. The Dracut Housing Authority provides housing for eligible low income families and disabled persons.

    The Town provides general governmental services for the territory within its boundaries including police and fire protection, disposal of garbage and recyclables, public education in grades K through 12, sewer services, streets, parks and recreation. Water services are provided by the Town and the Dracut Water Supply District, the latter an independent entity.

    Dunstable

    Dunstable is a rural community located just south of the Nashua, New Hampshire border which encompasses a little under 17 square miles.  Besides Nashua, Dunstable is also bordered by Hollis, New Hampshire at its northwest edge, Pepperell to the west, Tyngsborough to the east and Groton to the south.  The majority of the town is zoned single family and farming with an estimated population count of fewer than 3,300 people spread out amongst some 1000 +/- households.

    As is common with many small communities, there is a lot of volunteer participation and contributions that make things happen. As an example, Dunstable fortunately has volunteer groups who have undertaken the responsibility for pulling together and orchestrating many of the activities that residents look forward to including the Memorial Day Parade and Summer Concert Series, funded mostly through donations. Dunstable has a gardening group who volunteers their time and raises funds for plantings around town. The group has taken on the responsibility for designing, planting & maintaining the flower beds around the Town Hall, on the Town Common, the watering trough, Police Station and Fire Station to name a few.

    Dunstable is a rural community located just south of the Nashua, New Hampshire border which encompasses a little under 17 square miles.  Besides Nashua, Dunstable is also bordered by Hollis, New Hampshire at its northwest edge, Pepperell to the west, Tyngsborough to the east and Groton to the south.  The majority of the town is zoned single family and farming with an estimated population count of fewer than 3,300 people spread out amongst some 1000 +/- households.

    As is common with many small communities, there is a lot of volunteer participation and contributions that make things happen. As an example, Dunstable fortunately has volunteer groups who have undertaken the responsibility for pulling together and orchestrating many of the activities that residents look forward to including the Memorial Day Parade and Summer Concert Series, funded mostly through donations. Dunstable has a gardening group who volunteers their time and raises funds for plantings around town. The group has taken on the responsibility for designing, planting & maintaining the flower beds around the Town Hall, on the Town Common, the watering trough, Police Station and Fire Station to name a few.

    Lowell

    The City of Lowell is the fourth largest city in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Its strategic location at the intersections of Routes 495, 93 and 3, provides excellent access to all points of interest in Massachusetts as well as New Hampshire and Maine. Commuter rail also provides an easy 40-minute ride to Boston's North Station.

    Lowell's National Park is known as one of the greatest tributes to the Industrial Revolution and the textile industry that boomed in New England in the nineteenth century. The rehabilitated mill buildings are further complemented by 2.5 miles of trolley tracks, canal boat tours, and several museums.

    The 3200-seat Lowell Auditorium hosts many of the country's best performers at affordable prices. The Merrimack Repertory Theatre, which is also located in downtown Lowell, is one of the few self-sustaining repertory theater groups in the northeast.

    The 19th century mill buildings provide an excellent opportunity for low-cost acquisition and rehabilitation for small and large companies. The city offers many unique financial incentives to encourage new growth and development. The city's workforce is computer literate and strongly supported by the local school district, which has just completed nine new schools and five school rehabilitations. The education base also includes Middlesex Community College and The University of Massachusetts Lowell. The student population further enhances the market for retail businesses in downtown Lowell and its surrounding neighborhoods.

    This planned urban community is built around the Merrimack River and its diverse canal system, which provided power to the early manufacturers. Today these water amenities add to the character of the city. Special events of the year include a folk festival, known as the best in New England and draws over 200,000 people annually, Riverfest, First Night, and Fourth of July fireworks.

    Tyngsborough

    The Town of Tyngsborough is a small residential community located in the Northwest section of Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Composed of 17.86 square miles of land and surface water, Tyngsborough borders the towns of Dunstable, Groton, Westford, Chelmsford, Dracut, the City of Lowell, as well as the State of New Hampshire communities of Hudson, Pelham, and the City of Nashua. Tyngsborough is 44 miles northwest (71 km) from Boston along the recently widened Route 3 corridor. The town calls itself ‘The Gateway to the White Mountains’ of New Hampshire, which is the source of the Merrimack River that bisects the town.
    Tyngsborough, was once part of the original Dunstable, MA Township initially settled in 1661 by Colonel Jonathan Tyng named in honor of his mother Mrs. Edward Tyng, who emigrated from Dunstable in Bedfordshire, England.  The Tyngs were among the early settlers of the land purchased from the Wamisit and Naticook Indians in 1661 for £20 sterling. This 200 square miles area covered most of current day towns that surround Tyngsborough including Nashua and Hollis, NH.

    The Tyng Mansion House built in 1673 was one of the oldest homes north of Boston. During the founding period, settlers of Tyngsborough fought a series of small, but often bloody skirmishes with Wamisit and Naticook tribes, several colonial era homes in town still have emergency passage ways used during attacks.

    On February 23, 1809, Tyngsborough was incorporated as a town, breaking away from Dunstable.  As the town grew, Tyngsborough became known for its ferries, quarries, and box companies. Until the late 1960's, Tyngsborough was a vacation community with a large seasonal population.

    To date the town population is 11,673 but has experienced a tremendous burst in residential construction in the last decade as part of Greater Boston while keeping its rural charm. Tyngsborough enjoys a strategic position in the Merrimack Valley between Lowell, MA and Nashua, NH.